Hello Richard, Thanks for your comment and for your support! WooCommerce is a solid ecommerce tool (they were purchased by WordPress last year, I believe). They're flexible and you can bolt on a lot of different tools, but the downside for a "typical" business person is that to use WooCommerce (and WordPress) well, they'll need to invest more time into learning and managing the tools, or hire someone knowledgeable for help. A lot of new small businesses just don't have the mental bandwidth and time to learn the in's and out's of operating a WordPress site efficiently and effectively. The article you mentioned focuses more on hosted ecommerce builders, versus platform where you need to get your own hosting services (and there more technically and administratively challenging for users). We did highlight WooCommerce briefly in this guide where we dig into the differences between hosted and non-hosted ecommerce platforms. Jeremy
I’m an employer and I don’t really care where you went to school or what your GPA was — I want to know what you’ve done. Paid off student loan debt bytutoring computer science in New York? Rock on. Raised $20,000 on kickstarter for a Daft Punk tribute album? Awesome! Started the ‘dear photograph’ meme? Splendid! Blogged years worth of eating across the world and now creating food-tour-guides? Now we’re cooking with bacon.

Starting with Wix's ADI (artificial design intelligence) tool, several of the site builders now offer a tool that lets you enter social accounts and other personal or business info, and presto bingo, they get you a no-work website. Jimdo and Simvoly now offer similar if somewhat less ambitious tools. Wix's ADI even impressed a professional designer acquaintance of ours with results we saw in testing, mostly using images and information it scraped from her LinkedIn account.
If you prefer a more traditional URL, you'll need to purchase one from the likes of GoDaddy or Namecheap. Domain name pricing can range from extremely cheap to extremely expensive, depending on whether or not domain squatters are looking to flip a valuable piece of online real estate. You'll want to get something short but evocative and catchy, and depending on what you do, you may find that many of your first choices are taken by either other legit domains, or by squatters who've scooped up the names as an investment. For more, please read How to Register a Domain Name.
However, in 2018, a website building platform, also called a “content management system” (CMS), can be used to easily build and customize a website without having to use code. A website building platform is software that does all the complex work of coding for you, so you don’t need to learn how to create a website from scratch with code. It lets you build and edit a website through your internet browser, change your design and layout with the click of a button, and create pages and posts using a simple editor that is similar to most common text editors.
For years Adobe Dreamweaver has been synonymous with web page creation. It's gone from being a creator of HTML pages in a WYSIWYG interface to being able to handle programming pages in Cold Fusion, JavaScript, PHP, and other formats. Its liquid layout lets you see how pages look at different browser and screen sizes—even on smartphones and tablets. It's about as code-heavy as you want it to be.
Do you want to include a blog? This will be helpful for search engine optimization (SEO) — more on that in a minute — encourage engagement and community, and establish you as an expert. If the blog is the cornerstone of your site, take some time to outline (or, for overachievers, write) your first few posts and plan some topics you might write about over the next year.
To create and edit a website, you need a text editor. Text editors create and modify unformatted text files.  Other formats, like RTF, let you to add formatting, like bold or underline.  Those formats are not suitable for writing web pages. You should put some thought into which text editor you use, since you'll be working with it extensively while you're building the website.
The cost of making a website depends on a lot of different factors. If you decide to build your site with WordPress, you can get a new site for less than $50. For example, hosting a WP site with Bluehost will cost you only $2.95 per month, and that includes the registration of a custom domain! You will definitely need to invest a few bucks extra on a premium theme (which will probably be something in a range of $40-120), maybe a few premium plugins (on average, a plugin will cost you about $70), but that’s pretty much it.

I own a small business and am looking to redesign our website. Thanks for all your comparisons of the website builders! I currently use Mailchimp to send out weekly emails to my customers. Do you know if any of these website builder sites allow you to create an email list? Then use a template to create an email (like Mailchimp) and send it out to all your subscribers. Ideally there would be a tab on your website people can click on to enter their email address…..They would then get your emails. Thanks for any feedback :)
If you’ve never built a website before and you have no coding or design experience, this is the place to start. In this project, we learn how to build a modern portfolio website for desktops, tablets, and mobile devices. We start with basic HTML and CSS syntax. Next, we learn how to build custom web pages with an image gallery and contact page. Finally, we walk through how to share a website live on the web.
Professional Images and Videos: One of the simplest ways to enhance your content is by including rich, relevant images or videos on your website. Depending on your business type, you may already have a large portfolio of beautiful images you wish to display on your site. Alternatively, you can find high quality stock images and videos online. With a wide range of websites that allow you to access and download millions of images for a small fee (typically $1-$10) , the options are endless!

It is beyond the scope of this website to go into the details of HTML. Fortunately the internet is full of tutorials, articles and how-to's. The website that helped me the most was W3 Schools because it has good tutorials from beginners to expert levels. Do a few tutorials and in no time you will be writing your own HTML web pages with images, tables and italic emphasis.
I’m pretty new to the whole web development/design aspect of things. I’ve tinkered before with free things but more specifically with forum design. I’m very interested in building a website but aside from having a main traditional website feel I’m looking to incorporate a forum to it. Would it be possible to do this with this WordPress/BlueHost tutorial here? Or would there be something you recommend for that sort of thing?
What about if you build a website for someone and they want to be able to update the content themselves without needing to read any code? Most people have very little technical knowledge and just want to be able to upload new pictures and change text by typing into a word processor. This is where the CMS comes in. The most used software on the internet is Wordpress. You’ve probably heard of it; it’s blogging software that has evolved to include some CMS functionality. Along with other offerings like Wix and Weebly, it’s mostly used by people without a technical background as a quick DIY website solution. Themes can easily be bought and installed which provide an instant website and certain content can be updated by an admin area.
Client side means what goes on in the user’s browser. JavaScript is perhaps the next thing to try adding to your website and it’s where the actual programming begins. Up until now it’s just been writing tags (HTML) and rules (CSS). Javascript will allow your site to react to user actions, rearrange elements on the fly and even add new HTML tags where there weren’t any before. There are many frameworks for Javascript which will save you time and will often do things far more efficiently than you could yourself. JQuery is by far the most popular.

Even after making all the tables on this website, I still do a search on Google for HTML tables every time I need to create a new table. I cut the example, paste it on my new web page and then edit it for my specific needs. You do not need to memorize how to use every single HTML element - you just need to know that you need it and recognize it when you see it.
If you study my current site, you’ll see that most of my main sections link out to other places on the web – my YouTube channel, my podcasts, the speaking page here on College Info Geek, etc. This is a strategic decision – as a professional YouTuber/writer, those are the best places for me to be directing people, since I benefit from people subscribing to my content rather than evaluating it.
hello, I can't find an answer for this anywhere ...maybe I'm just asking a wrong question...but I just created a website.....and trying to figure out how to have DESKTOP SHORTCUT ICON of my OWN website that I just created....so when someone visits my site and decide to keep it on their desktop....I want them to have my own designed icon to their desktop of my own website. maybe you can help? thank you!

With all that being said, I want to share some things you can do to improve your website’s SEO. To keep things simple, we’ll take an 80/20 approach here – as in 80% of the results come from 20% of the efforts. Yes, there are lots of tiny little tweaks you can make to marginally improve SEO – and if you’re curious about them, you might want to check out this set of tutorials.


After all the work you put into it, I feel not a little stupid, in needing to ask you anything else. The truth is I am a slightly long in the tooth septuagenarian with about as much nous as someone dropping in on a day trip from the fourteenth century. I want to promote (tell as many people as possible) about my new book, and hopefully sell one or two.
Hi Ben, Thanks so much for the great feedback, so glad you enjoyed reading the article! Please do share it on if you think your friends will find it useful too. It's true Wix isn't for everybody, but it did do extremely well in our research (which is why it's our best all-round website builder)! WordPress is another great option and I'm glad you're happy with them - Bluehost is certainly a great choice of provider for your WordPress site! If you were looking at changing or setting up another site why not check out our comparison chart or our article on the best Wix alternatives? I've included the links in case you find them interesting. Thanks for reading, Lucy
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